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7th of March 2005

An Airbus A310-304ET was operating a scheduled passenger flight from Bangkok (Thailand) to Tehran (Iran). After completing the flight preparations the aircraft had taken off from Bangkok Don Muang International Airport and the flight continued along its planned route without any abnormality, following the flightplan.

The right hand General Electric CF6-80C2A2 after the aircraft came to a stop. (© anon)


During the approach to Tehran Mehrbad airport, the autopilot was disconnected and the approach was hand flown. The co-pilot was the pilot flying and the captain was the pilot monitoring. The thrust reverser of the right engine was inoperative, this was recorded in the Aircraft Technical Log and was in accordance with the MEL.

The approach and landing to runway 29L at Theran were uneventful. Upon compression of the main landing gear struts, the spoilers were extended. The thrust reverser on the left engine was deployed and reverse thrust was increased to maximum. Deceleration of the aircraft was as expected and at 80 knots the reverse thrust setting on the left engine was reduced to a medium setting, between idle reverse and maximum reverse thrust. At the same time, the throttle for the right engine was brought out of the forward idle position to a Throttle Lever Angle of approximately 55º. (this was determined based on the FDR recording of the landing)

The left hand General Electric CF6-80C2A2 after the aircraft came to a stop. (© anon)

Throttle movement for the right-hand engine from this point in time was accompanied by movement of the lefthand engine.

The captain realised that they were running out of runway and took over control. He selected maximum reverse on the left-hand engine while bringing the right-hand engine back to idle. However hi sanctions were too late and the aircraft left the paved runway area at a speed of approximately 40 knots, Coming to a stop on soft ground a short while later. None of the passengers or the crew members was injured during the runway overrun. Both engines however received substantial damage with the right engine ingesting a lot of sand.

The right hand General Electric CF6-80C2A2 after the aircraft came to a stop. Note the large amount of sand in the intake (© anon)


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